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Press release – Urgent action needed as half of Scotland’s health boards fail to meet targets for child mental health treatment

  •  NHS Scotland as a whole fails to meet waiting time target dating from December 2014
  • Half the health boards are failing to meet an 18 week waiting time target dating from December 2014:
    • NHS Ayrshire & Arran, NHS Fife, NHS Forth Valley, NHS Grampian, NHS Lanarkshire, NHS Lothian, and NHS Shetland*
  • Almost a quarter (23%) of those referred to CAMHS were not accepted for treatment.

The Scottish Children’s Services Coalition has called for urgent action from the Scottish Government to increase investment in and radically improve mental health services for children and young people.

Our call comes as new waiting time figures are published today (6th December) from the Information Services Division of National Services Scotland, part of NHS Scotland. 

Covering the quarter from July to September 2016, these figures indicate that only seven out of 14 health boards met a Scottish Government waiting time target for access by children and young people to specialist Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS).

The NHS in Scotland provides mental health services for children and young people with a wide range of mental health problems including anxiety, behaviour problems, depression and early onset psychosis. Half of all diagnosable mental health problems start before the age of 14 and 75 per cent by the age of 21.

The SCSC has called for a radical transformation of mental health services, with greater investment in CAMHS, as well as a renewed focus on prevention and early intervention in the Scottish Government’s soon to be published Mental Health Strategy. This includes in-school counselling, on-demand counselling services in GP surgeries and greater community support generally, reducing the need for referral to pressed specialist CAMHS.

The coalition has also called for Action Plans to be put in place for those health boards failing to achieve the waiting time target, with its ultimate aim that those children and young people requiring it should get the help they need, when they need it.

The Scottish Government set a target, which dates from December 2014, for the NHS in Scotland to deliver a maximum waiting time of 18 weeks from a patients’ referral to treatment for specialist CAMHS. The target should be delivered for at least 90% of patients.

The new figures indicate that between June and September, for NHS Scotland as a whole, 78.8% of children and young people were being treated within this 18 week waiting time, short of the 90% target set by the Scottish Government.

Seven of the 14 health boards failing to achieve the maximum 18 week waiting time were NHS Ayrshire & Arran (85.5%), NHS Fife (86.8%), NHS Forth Valley (51.1%), NHS Grampian (37.6%), NHS Lothian (55.8%), NHS Lanarkshire (72.3%) and NHS Shetland (80.0%).*

The figures published also indicate that while 7,153 children and young people were referred to CAMHS, only 5,518 were accepted for treatment. The coalition has raised concerns over what action is taken to address the almost quarter not accepted for treatment.

This comes on the back of evidence pointing to the fact that only 0.46% of NHS Scotland expenditure is spent on child and adolescent mental health.

The SCSC has highlighted that if  there is increased investment in mental health services, this will not only cut waiting times, ensuring the early diagnosis and treatment of those children and young people with mental health problems, but also address the social and economic costs of failing to address these.

These costs are well-established.  Those affected are more likely, for example, to be unemployed, homeless, get caught up in the criminal justice system, or are in extremely costly long-term care. In many cases this can be prevented through early intervention.

A spokesperson for the SCSC, said:

“These statistics, which highlight that half our health boards were failing to meet maximum waiting times, should act as a wake-up call to the Scottish Government as it looks to publish its new Mental Health Strategy.

“We know that half of all diagnosable mental health problems start before the age of 14 and 75 per cent by the age of 21. As such it is vitally important that we radically improve mental health services and increase investment in these, with an overall aim of ensuring that children and young people get the help they need, when they need it.

“We need to radically transform mental health services, with a focus on preventing such problems arising in the first place and intervening early to ensure that children and young people are able to realise their full potential. This includes investing in greater community support and reduces the need for referral to pressed specialist CAMHS.

“As a coalition we are delighted that the Scottish Government has committed an additional £150 million in mental health services over the next five years, and that this is to be partly used to bring down child and adolescent mental health waiting times.

“We would however urge that the Scottish Government and Mental Health Minister act quickly and increase investment from the current figure of less than 0.5 per cent of the NHS budget. This will ensure that those requiring it are given the support they need, so that those children and young people requiring these services do not miss out.

“We also need to ensure that those who are not accepted for treatment are given the care and support they need, and the reasons for not providing treatment given.

“Families usually experience months of waiting even before a referral to CAMHS. The consequent delay in diagnosis and appropriate support can lead to a crisis situation for the child or young person concerned, as well as for their family, and the need for costly extra resources to address this.”

*Due to data quality issues the reported figure for NHS Highland does not represent 100% of tier 2 patients seen in month.

ENDS

For further information please contact Alex Orr, Policy and Communications Adviser to the Scottish Children’s Services Coalition, on 0131 603 8996 or contact@thescsc.org.uk.

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About the Author

The SCSC is a collection of leading independent and third sector service providers. Members deliver specialist care and education services for children and young people with complex needs and care experience.